A CONSERVATIVE CHOICE FOR THE MINORITY'S VOICE

Education

We Can Overcome

chappyby Tommy Davis

Race seems to be the controlling criterion in contemporary dialogue when it comes to evaluating relationships among black and white Americans.  Nothing is more harmful to the brainpower of black people than the elevation of the myth that one cannot thrive due to racism.  Undeniably, racism is a reality, but it has never been sufficient enough to prevent black Americans from gaining an economic advantage in a struggle to better ourselves.

In 1834, a group of Connecticut businessmen declared that the “white man cannot labor upon equal terms with the negro….the black can afford to offer his services at lower prices than the white man.”  Fugitive slaves had escaped there and opened businesses.  When slavery ended in 1865, blacks carried their work ethic into the free market.  Their white counterparts legislatively enacted discriminatory laws in an effort to stifle the competition from blacks.

Many 19th century black Americans wanted nothing more than the freedom to be productive.  A shared intellectual currency at the time motivated blacks to perform very well without viewing race as a disability.  In the 1870s, blacks occupied positions as lieutenant governor, mayor, sheriff, magistrates, treasurer, superintendent of education in five states including Republican Speakers of the House in Mississippi and South Carolina.

One day after Congress approved the Thirteenth Amendment ending slavery, Republican Senator Charles Sumner introduced a motion that made John Rock the first black attorney to be admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was already an American teacher, doctor, dentist, and abolitionist.  John Rock was also one of the first black Americans to earn a medical degree (1852).

It’s how we respond to experiences and learning that makes the difference.   In 1910, 71 percent of blacks over nine years of age were employed or operated family businesses.  This heightened racial tensions that prompted whites to burn down black business and suppress the black vote in an effort to gain economic ground.

We needed the government to protect our civil liberties rather than provide wealth.  When the 1964 Civil Rights Act came up for argument and a vote, Senator Olin Johnston, a Democrat from South Carolina said: “This is indeed the blackest day in the U.S. Senate since 1875, when Congress passed a civil rights bill similar to this one.  It was 89 years ago that the [Republican] Congress passed the nefarious Reconstruction era civil rights laws, identical with what we are now discussing….”     It was Republican William McCullough who stated in supporting the bill:  “I believe in the right of each individual to have his constitutional rights guaranteed.  On the other hand, he must always be prepared to shoulder the obligations and assume the burdens of citizenship….”

Rev. Tommy Davis is a full time chaplain in upstate New York


Abolitionism and the Evangelical Heritage

Providence Crowder

Providence Crowder

by Providence Crowder

Author Donald W. Dayton produced a remarkable historical summary of America’s evangelical[1] legacy in his work entitled, “Discovering an Evangelical Heritage.” This book provides compelling evidence that confirms “the Christian witness” has a powerful impact upon society when the gospel is put into action.  Unlike contemporary evangelicalism, which by and large evades questions of social responsibility,[2] Dayton sets out to prove that the evangelical heritage left by nineteenth century evangelicals such as Catherine Booth and Charles G. Finney demonstrated that the gospel and social responsibility were once intimately integrated.  He provides thrilling accounts of how the nineteenth century evangelical “abolitionists”[3] understood that to right societal wrongs, social injustice demanded a radical and Christian response.  The abolitionist movement was chiefly political and religious; abolitionists believed that slavery was a sin.  Through moral suasion, they set out to change laws in an effort to permanently abolish it. (more…)


Unsinking the Titanic: Repairing the Hole that is America’s Debt Dilemma – Part 3

by Providence Crowder

Final Thoughts . . .

If we as a nation truly want to do right by our poor, we must urge our politicians to get out of salvation politics and leave the “saving” of the poor and needy of society to the faith-based communities.  A safety net of government services can be a good thing, but it profits no one if we put so much on it that it rips under the bureaucratic pressure of big government.   If our federal government truly respected American citizens, then they would stop robbing us and selling us back our own goods at a higher price!  They would end the practice of deficit spending for programs and entitlements that do more harm than help and pass a balanced budget amendment requiring the federal government to exercise responsibility and restraint concerning its outrageous spending.  All Americans are expected to live within their means; therefore, so should the government we elect.  (more…)


Are Tea Party Protestors Racists?

By Rev. Wayne Perryman

Before the 2008 election a white pastor friend of mine asked to meet with me. He wanted my advice and counsel on how to deal with the discussions within his congregation regarding the election and what I thought would happen as a result of the election. Some of his members supported Obama and others supported McCain.

After a healthy discussion on the Bible and Politics, I predicted that Obama would win in part because Americans were tired of the war in Iraq and because Obama was well educated, good looking, very articulate, America’s first black candidate and because many whites wanted to prove that they were not prejudice – but his presidency (from a racial standpoint) will divide us, not unite us. Why? Because there will be those in the media and in his camp who will not hesitate to play the race card when whites disagreed with his policies. Well, we all know my first prediction came true, he is the President, but sadly, we see the second one coming true as well. Those who disagree with his policies are being called racist. (more…)


Republicans and A New Reconstruction, by Tommy Davis

Normally, when it comes to government programs that attempt to address ethnic bigotry, I am a total critic. Policies that include contemporary affirmative action actually turned out to encourage discrimination rather than discourage unfairness when it comes to certain groups of people.

The original affirmative action ruled out race as a factor. Contemporary affirmative action leads to the underdevelopment of those who did not really obtain success through candid competition; but rather through policies that reward failure and penalize someone else’s achievement.

As a Republican, I understand that laws must be initiated that would prevent citizens from being deprived of their human and citizenship rights by other citizens. In January of 1865, Republican President Lincoln prompted Congress to enact the Thirteenth Amendment ending slavery. The Civil War ended that same year when General Lee surrendered on April 9 with Lincoln being assassinated 6 days later. (more…)


Republicans and Uncle Toms

by Chaplain  Tommy Davis (November 17, 2012)

You may have heard some people refer to certain black Americans as “Uncle Tom.”  This term is widely used as derisive language to discredit the accomplishments of successful black Americans who probably overcame poverty through hard work.  What many black Americans are unaware of is the fact that “Uncle Tom” was an actual hero.  This fictional character helped slaves escape the harsh plantations according to the novel titled “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”  You may have also heard people say: “Republicans don’t like black people.”

Equally troubling is the fact that many people use the phrase “Uncle Tom” in a negative light having never read the book.  In the same way, black Americans are unaware of the rich history of the Republican Party. They only pass on negative information having never researched the accounts of the past. (more…)


Does the Bible Promote Socialism – Part 4

by Providence Crowder

So How then Can Government Help?

President Abraham Lincoln declared: “The legitimate object of Government is to do for a community of people whatever they need to have done but cannot do at all, or cannot so well do for themselves in their separate and individual capacities.  But in all that people can individually do as well for themselves, Government ought not to interfere.”

To further minimize the dependency on and scope of government, peoples, communities, churches, and organizations throughout the ages have often voluntarily “done for others” what others could not do for themselves.  In America and Europe, organizations such as the YMCA, the YWCA, and the Salvation Army were Christian initiatives established to, as Gonzalez has said, “reach the impoverished and unchurched masses.”  Ordinary people saw a need and responded.  The United Way and the American Red Cross were also developed to aid those in need.  Voluntary contributions have allowed them to successfully aid millions.  (more…)